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Monday, 03 May 2021 00:00

Some Achilles tendon injuries such as ruptures or tears may not respond to nonsurgical care. In some patients, surgery may be an option to repair the tendon and restore its functionality and strength. There are different methods a podiatric surgeon can use which may be performed as outpatient (same-day) surgery. While in recovery, it is important to follow your podiatrist’s instructions. Pain medicine may be suggested or prescribed during the first few days following the procedure. Crutches—and keeping your leg elevated as much as possible—will help keep weight off of your leg to reduce pain and swelling. When your stitches are ready to be removed, your podiatrist will fit you with a removable boot or cast. They will also assess when the time is right to start putting weight on your leg and how you can help strengthen your ankle and leg muscles. Full recovery may take weeks or months, depending on a variety of factors.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Joe Mathew George DPM, FACFAS of Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Joliet, Bolingbrook, and Channahon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 26 April 2021 00:00

If your podiatrist suspects that you have poor circulation in your lower limbs they may suggest having a Doppler ultrasound exam performed. A Doppler ultrasound is an imaging study that uses sound waves to measure the amount of blood flow through your arteries and veins. This test can be used to detect conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, superficial thrombophlebitis, arteriosclerosis, thromboangiitis obliterans, and vascular tumors. A podiatrist may also use the Doppler ultrasound to check for blood vessel damage or narrowing or hardening of blood vessels, which can interrupt blood flow to the feet and legs. Once the cause of your poor circulation has been found, your doctor will be able to determine the next steps in treating and managing your condition. If you suffer from poor circulation in your feet or ankles, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Joe Mathew George DPM, FACFAS from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Joliet, Bolingbrook, and Channahon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 19 April 2021 00:00

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a restriction of blood flow to the muscles and organs due to the build-up of plaque on artery walls. PAD starves muscles and organs of the oxygen and nutrients they need to function properly—especially during physical activities. This lack of oxygen-rich blood to the extremities can make it difficult to walk and can also cause pain in the feet and legs. This pain from PAD can go undetected in people who also suffer from diabetes and neuropathy, possibly leading to foot sores which—when caused by severe blood flow reduction—can increase the risk of amputation. Individuals who are afflicted with PAD and/or diabetes should be under the care of a podiatrist who can help to manage these conditions and improve overall health.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Joe Mathew George DPM, FACFAS from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Joliet, Bolingbrook, and Channahon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 12 April 2021 00:00

Patients who are afflicted with a bunion may choose to have surgery that can permanently repair this foot condition. A bunion is defined as a large, bony protrusion that develops on the bottom of the big toe. Common causes for a bunion to form can include genetic factors, or from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. For severe bunions, many patients consider having surgery repair the affected joint. Additionally, bunion surgery may be successful in correcting the ligaments and tendons that may have shifted from the growing bunion. If you have a bunion, and are considering having surgery performed, it is strongly suggested that a podiatrist be consulted for an in depth discussion about the risks and rewards of bunion surgery.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Joe Mathew George DPM, FACFAS of Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Joliet, Bolingbrook, and Channahon, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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